Curious Kinkajou finds Leo Leo Gelato

Curious Kinkajou finds Leo Leo Gelato from Niccolo on Vimeo.

This furry Kinkajou (also known as the Honey Bear) loves the sweet, creamy artisan flavors of Leo Leo Gelato!

Many thanks to our friends at Conservation Ambassadors in Paso Robles, CA, for introducing us to the Kinkajou. Conservation Ambassadors helps to rehabilitate and give permanent homes to abused, abandoned or permanently injured wild and exotic animals, like the Kinkajou. Their Zoo to You outreach program shares animals with school children and learners of all ages to educate them about conservation, connect them to the wild world, and inspire them to protect the planet.

 

Zoo to You Raccoon Gets a Taste of Leo Leo Gelato

Raccoon Gets a Taste of Leo Leo Gelato from Niccolo on Vimeo.

Even raccoons can’t resist the sweet, creamy flavors of Leo Leo Gelato!

Thanks to our friends at Conservation Ambassadors, Paso Robles, CA for setting up this meet and greet with their raccoon. Conservation Ambassadors helps to rehabilitate and give permanent homes to abused, abandoned or permanently injured wild and exotic animals, like the raccoon. Their Zoo to You outreach program shares animals with school children and learners of all ages to educate them about conservation, connect them to the wild world, and inspire them to protect the planet.

4 Reasons Why Gelato is Sexier than Ice Cream

Leo Leo GelatoRetro is all the rage. You can’t shake a stick without hitting a wax mustachioed mixologist who pickles veggies “for fun.” If what’s old is truly new again, then that modern, mass produced ice cream whipped with mostly air and nasty fillers is straight up cramping your style, OK? Gelato, which dates back to 3000 BC, is as old school as it gets, sonny. Leo Leo Gelato doesn’t just harken back to the olden days when quality ruled—it’s also delicious to the max. This, along with the following four reasons, proves exactly why gelato is sexier than ice cream. Mark my words. You will become a gelato snob quicker than you can say “locally sourced quinoa.”

Leo Leo Gelato Artisan Flavors

It’s Craft

We’ve all heard of craft beer, craft cocktails, and craft coffee, right? Now, consider your frozen food section of the grocery store. Not much in the way of hand crafted, authentic fare, huh? Proudly producedin Paso Robles, Leo Leo Gelato is made in small batches with epic ingredients like fresh fruit, and exotic spices, and quality chocolate…and it’s always mixed cold, the old fashioned way. That means bright, zingy flavors that cut straight to your tastebuds and rock your senses (blackberry cheesecake, anyone?). Click here to see a luscious lineup of local flavors…and trust me, there are more than a few artisinal flavor mashups you just have to taste to believe.

Beer for BreakfastKiller Beer Gelato

Leo Leo Gelato wants you to have your beer and eat it too! No, you haven’t died and gone to beer heaven…Leo Leo has recently teamed up with SLO Brewing Co. to create a coveted selection of hoppy, nutty, sour, and fruity beer combinations like Sculpin Grapefruit beer mixed with grapefruit gelato, Firestone Brewing Co. stout mixed with roasted, nutty flavors, and sour brews imbued with berrylicious allure. Check here for updates and be the first on your block to get your hands on some killer ice cream beer this May!

It’s Local

Leo Leo Gelato Honey LavendarPaso Robles may be the land of award winning wines, but those vivacious vines could never overshadow the community’s stellar epicurean community. From olive and walnut oil to fabulous boutiques and cuisine, Paso Robles locals have a way of coloring outside the lines with delicious results. Leo Leo Gelato is the perfect example of this adventurous spirit. Owner Niccolo Lekai started the biz after enjoying gelato in Italy as a kid and learning from a tried-and-true master gelatier as a young man. You know what they say: Be the dessert you wish to see in the world.

It’s Great for Gluten and Dairy Free Folks

15Next dinner party, end your night of foodie fun with a dessert that everyone can enjoy (and digest!) Leo Leo Gelato uses a gluten free base for all of their creations (some flavors include ingredients with gluten, others do not), and nearly all of their sorbet flavors are dairy free. Did you know that American sherbet usually contains dairy, gelatin or egg whites? Toss that boring tub and spring for a local favorite with less than half the fat of ice cream. As Niccolo likes to say, “Here’s to healthier eating, happy taste buds and feeling great!” I’ll clink spoons to that!

This blog was written by Hayley Thomas, food and wine writer for New Times and PasoRoblesWineries.net. You can reach her at hthomas@newtimesslo.com.

Leo Leo Gelato Baby Spring Lamb

A wobbly one day old lamb explores the rangeland and discovers artisan made Leo Leo Gelato! Leo Leo Gelato’s Niccolo, is the master gelatier from Paso Robles, CA. His specialty gelato and sorbetto is available Nationwide and distributed to the finest retail gelato stores, as well as restaurants and hotels.

This video was filmed at the Adelaida Springs Ranch in Paso Robles by the talented Nathan Stuart of Shepherd’s Films and produced by Lauren Lekai of PasoRoblesWineries.net.

Leo Leo Gelato Baby Spring Lamb from Leo Leo Gelato on Vimeo.

Our Condolences. Your Ice Cream Has Been Lying To You

They’re both cold, they’re both desserts, and they’re both pretty hard to resist on a summer afternoon. Yes, ice cream and gelato have a lot in common at first glance. But, as you are about to learn right now—they are, in fact, totally different beasts.

Let’s hop in the Leo Leo Time Machine and go way, way back—back to the 1500s, when Gelato first hit the shelves in Italy. The low-fat, egg free, and gluten free treat gained its longtime popularity thanks to its dense, velvety texture, bright flavor, and relatively guilt-free allure. See, traditional Gelato has always been made with fresh milk and a dash of cream—never with dulling butterfat or other heavy fillers.Leo-Leo_Gelato_Lavender-Vanilla

At Leo Leo, we continue to create gelato the old fashioned way, adding premium local ingredients (fruit, chocolate, herbs, even local wine and Firestone beer) before churning and slow-freezing. Consider this our one-two punch from a killer gelato. Colder temps = less air. Less air means you’re getting the vibrant flavor your tastebuds crave.

Now, let’s look at that ice cream cone in your hand—the one that is threatening to drip down your elbow, leaving a too-sweet, sticky mess. Nothing against ice cream, but it’s just not our jam. Why? Well, most American ice creams are full of hot air. To be clear, that pint of chocolate chip isn’t all it appears to be. It’s whipped at high speeds and contains at least 50 percent more air than gelato (and yes: that means you’re paying for air, not dessert).

Kinda makes you wonder, “What else has your ice cream been lying about?”

Leo-Leo-Gelato_Strawberry

Plus—and you already know this, but ice cream can hardly claim to be a “healthy” indulgence (some brands contain as much as 24 percent butterfat). Lastly—and this is the nail in the coffin for us—ice cream is frozen at far lower temperatures, leading to a duller-tasting treat.

Who wants dull? Anyone?

With its bright, exciting flavors, healthier ingredients, and luxurious mouthfeel, I can imagine that mighty gelato will reign for another 500 years. Who knows…perhaps one day, aliens will be debating the virtues of gelato over ice cream, and they can refer back to this post. Times may change, but society will still need its beloved gelato break (we’re working on making that a “thing” in most offices).

Still not convinced? Let’s put it this way. When the best part of your dessert is the chocolate-dipped, sprinkle-coated waffle cone it came in, you’ve got to reassess your life.

Mic drop. Gelato out!

 

This blog was written by Hayley Thomas, food and wine writer for New Times and PasoRoblesWineries.net. You can reach her at hthomas@newtimesslo.com.